China Passes Controversial Hong Kong Security Law

On 29 June, China’s parliament passed a bill into law changing the 23 year old existence of Hong Kong since it was handed over to the Chinese government by its former colony Britain under condition that China would grant Hong Kong a high degree of autonomy for 50 years.

It is expected that Chinese state media will publish details of the security law which has been largely influenced by last year’s never ending violent pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong city.

In addition, the new law is expected to take care of terrorism, subversion, separatism and interference by external parties.

Immediately the bill was passed millions took to the social networks expressing how they feel and view the development. Some believe it will have a significant effect on Hong Kong’s rights and freedom.

“It marks the end of Hong Kong that the world knew before,” tweeted Joshua Wong, a pro-democracy activist.

Reports have it that under the newly passed security law, it has severe penalties against them the heaviest one being life imprisonment.

This development further pushes China at logger heads with U.S and other European countries which have been accusing China of interfering with the high degree of autonomy granted to Hong Kong for 50 years.

Mid-last month, U.S secretary of state Mike Pompeo warned against China’s interference in Hong Kong. Pompeo said China had been meddling in affairs of the city it shouldn’t further saying China was interfering with U.S journalists based in Hong Kong.

Pompeo said U.S would be assessing the status of Hong Kong by the country. On May 27, United States announced Hong Kong had lost its autonomy status due to increased China’s influence in the city.

The U.S further said Hong Kong won’t be receiving any special treatment from them with the state department further hinting Trump’s administration was considering ending some or all special trade and economic relation between U.S and Hong Kong.

Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, held a press statement while passing of the bill was underway. She said it would be inappropriate of her to speak about the bill at that moment since the meeting was still going on but she made it clear that not any kind of sanctions would scare Hong Kong.

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